Cisco Nexus 7010 Vs. Nexus 7710

We know that fiber optic cable and transceiver are important components to complete the whole optical link. In addition, there is another core component in data center—switch, which is the nerve center of the whole network deployment. This article will introduce two Cisco switches—Cisco Nexus 7010 switch and Cisco Nexus 7710 switch, and make a comparison between the two network switches.

Overview of Cisco Nexus 7010 Switch And Cisco Nexus 7710 Switch

Characterized by high availability and scalability, comprehensive Cisco NX-OS Software data center switching feature set, Cisco Nexus 7010 switch and Nexus 7710 switch is designed to satisfy the demand for high switching capacity in data centers. As Cisco Nexus 7700 Series switches are the latest extension to the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series switches, there are similarities and differences between 7010 and 7710 switch. How much do you know about them? Keep reading and you will find the answer. The following figures show Cisco 7010 and 7710 switch.

Cisco Nexus 7010

Figure 1. Cisco Nexus 7010 switch

Cisco Nexus 7710

Figure 2. Cisco Nexus 7710 switch

Cisco Nexus 7010 Vs. Nexus 7710

From the above figures, we can have a basic knowledge of the two network switches. And the following part will focus on the similarities and differences between them.

Similarities Between Cisco Nexus 7010 Switch And Cisco Nexus 7710 Switch
  • Both of them are 10-slot chassis switch with 2 dedicated supervisor modules and 8 I/O modules.
  • Both of them are structured with 384 x 1 and 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports.
  • Both of them utilize front-to-back airflow which can ensure that switch addresses the requirement for hot-aisle and cold-aisle deployments to help provide efficient cooling.
  • Both of their I/O modules and supervisor modules are accessible from the front, and fabric modules and fan trays are accessible from the back of the chassis.
  • Both of their fan trays are composed of independent variable-speed fans which can automatically adjust to the ambient temperature, and this helps reduce power consumption in well-managed facilities while enables optimum operation of the switch.
  • Both of their systems not only allow hot swapping without affecting the system, but also support air filter to promote clean airflow through the system.
Differences Between Cisco Nexus 7010 Switch And Cisco Nexus 7710 Switch
  • Cisco Nexus 7010 switch has 48 x 40 Gigabit Ethernet ports, and 16 x 100 Gigabit Ethernet ports. While Cisco Nexus 7710 switch has 192 x 40 Gigabit Ethernet ports, and 96 x 100 Gigabit Ethernet ports.
  • Cisco Nexus 7010 switch has 5 fabric module slots and 3 power supply slots. While Cisco Nexus 7710 switch has 6 fabric module slots and 8 power supply slots.
  • Cisco Nexus 7010 switch supports Fabric—1 and Fabric—2 modules while Cisco Nexus 7710 switch supports only Fabric—2 modules.
  • Cisco Nexus 7010 switch is designed with 21RU height, bigger than Cisco Nexus 7710 switch’s 14RU height.
  • Cisco Nexus 7010 switch uses dual system and fabric fan trays for cooling. While Cisco Nexus 7710 switch uses three redundant fan trays for cooling.
  • The maximum inter-slot switching capacity with the Cisco Nexus 7010 switch is 550 Gbps while Cisco Nexus 7710 switch can achieve the maximum inter-slot switching capacity of 1.2 Tbps.
  • Cisco Nexus 7010 switch supports F1, F2 and F2e line cards while Cisco Nexus 7710 switch supports F2e and F3 line cards.
  • Cisco Nexus 7010 switch supports SUP1, SUP2 and SUP2E supervisors while Cisco Nexus 7710 switch supports only SUP2E supervisor engines.
  • Cisco N7K-C7010-FAN-Sis US $1,100.00 on eBay while Cisco N77-C7710-FAN is US $1,299.99.

Which One to Choose?

Both the two network switches are designed to meet the scalability requirements of the largest cloud environments. As for which one to choose, it all depends on your individual requirements. If you need higher switching capacity and smaller size, you can choose Cisco Nexus 7710 switch; if your budget is tight, Cisco Nexus 7010 switch is a good option; if you want your switch to support F1 line card and SUP1 supervisor engineer, you have to buy Cisco Nexus 7010 switch. FS.COM provides large stock single mode fiber patch cables and multimode fiber patch cables. Also, you can find various types of Cisco compatible transceiver modules for your Cisco network switch. For more details, please visit our site.

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Edgeswitch vs. Unifi switch

Recently, Ubiquiti Network Switch is of prevalence for building and expanding home network. EdgeSwitch and Unifi Switch are two main switch series of the Ubiquiti Network Switch. For years, the EdgeSwitch and Unifi Switch are featured as cost-effective, robust performance, and this is why many people have special favor on them. For they both a good choice for growing networks, it is necessary to make clear their differences and decide which one to choose. In this article, we will mainly introduce the EdgeSwitch vs Unifi Switch, similarities and differences as well as compatible SFP transceivers for them.

unifi-switch-8-mounting

Figure1: This picture shows Unifi Switch US-8-150W(Resource: www.Ubiquiti.com)

Introduction to Unifi Switch

The Unifi Switches provide 8, 16, 24, or 48 PoE Gigabit Ethernet ports to satisfy different requirement for expanding Gigabit Ethernet network and making your network cabling looks neat. They support IEEE 802.3af and IEEE 802.3at. And the operation is rather easy, you can directly connect your switch to a storage server through two SFP ports on each switch. The transmission rate can be up to 1 Gbps. For longer distance and higher bandwidth, you can use Unifi Switch with 48-port which additional added two more SFP+ port. The following picture shows a basic parameter of all the Unifi Switches models.

Chart1-Unifi Switch

Information About EdgeSwitch

As same as Unifi Switch, the EdgeSwitch have the same PoE Gigabit Ethernet ports and IEEE protocols. The most distinctive feature of Edgeswitch is that offers an extensive suite of advanced Layer-2 switching features and protocols, and also provides Layer-3 routing capability. There are 6 EdgeSwitch models, the accurate ports’ number are clearly shown in the below chart. You can use ES-8-150W, ES-16-150W and ES-24-250W as well as ES-24-500W switch models to achieve 1G Ethernet network connectivity. SFP+ transceivers, you can choose ES-48-500W, ES-48-750W to arrive 10 Gbps connection.

Chart2-EdgeSwitch

Similarities Between EdgeSwitch vs Unifi Switch

Both Unifi Switch and EdgeSwitch have 8, 16, 24, or 48 PoE Gigabit Ethernet ports.

—Switch models

As for edgeswitch vs unifi switch, the two switches basically share the identical switch type (switch ports and Watts), the only difference lies in the EdgeSwitch does not have one with 8 ports for 60W.

—Protocols

The Unifi Switch and EdgeSwitch both support IEEE 802.3af and IEEE 802.3at.

—Supporting Gigabit Ethernet

They are both support 1G and 10G Ethernet connection and have both SFP and SFP+ ports.

Differences Between EdgeSwitch vs Unifi Switch

—Color
The EdgeSwitch is black while the Unifi Switch is silver.

EdgeSwitch vs Unifi Switch

—Management

The Unifi Switch can only be managed through the UniFi controller while the EdgeSwitch can only be managed through it’s CLI or web interface.

—Routing protocols

The EdgeSwitches only support static routing, and there are no routing protocols implemented while Unifi Switches don’t support routing at all.

FS.COM’s Compatible SFP Module for EdgeSwitch vs Unifi Switch:

Multi-mode and single mode SFP models are available to Unifi and Edge switch. FS.COM is a leading manufacturer and supplier of fiber optic subsystems, components and solutions. Our optical modules are well known as the superior quality and high compatibility. Besides, all of our products are tested and 100% compatible to the major brands, such as Cisco, Juniper, Brocade, Arista, etc. You can rest assured to use them. For this Unifi and Edge switch, we offer the following compatible SFP module:

1000Base-LX: SFP1G-LX-31 1310nm (Single Mode SFPs).

1000Base-SX: SFP-1G85-5M (multi-mode).

1000Base-T: SFP-GB-GE-T Module.

FS's SFP+ transceiver

Conclusion

Ubiquiti Network Switch seems to be an irresistible trend for home network connectivity. Through this passage, we learned that EdgeSwitch vs Unifi switch and are different in color, management and routing protocols. If you are looking for compatible SFP transceivers for those two kinds of the switch, you can take FS.COM a try. In addition to SFP transceivers, we still offer many other optical products, such as patch cables, SFP+, QSFP and QSFP28 optical modules, network cables, switches, etc. If you are interested, you can visit www.fs.com.

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Network Virtualization and Challenges in SDN/NFV Implementation

Software defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) are two closely related technologies that are both toward network virtualization and automation. The occurrence of these two technologies are mainly driven by the requirements for robust data management systems and access to bandwidth by servers located at different sites and connected over long distances through public and private clouds. SDN and NFV have some similarities but they are different in many aspects. In addition, though SDN and NFV are highly promoted as next-generation dominants in recent years, there are still many challenges in successfully deploying them. This post will give some basic knowledge of SDN vs NFV, and the challenges faced in implementing SDN and NFV.

SDN vs NFV: What Are They?

Although SDN and NFV are both network virtualization technologies, they’re really not dependent on each other. And it is not always necessary to involve them in the same network. The infrastructures of SDN and NFV will be explained in the following text, and the major differences between them will be displayed.

What Is SDN?

The function of SDN is somewhat hinted by its name. With SDN, the users are able to manage and control the entire network through software that makes networks centrally programmable. It achieves this by separating the system that decides where traffic is sent (the control plane) from the underlying system that pushes packets of data to specific destinations (the data plane). As known to network administrators and value added resellers (VARs), SDN is built on network switches that can be programmed through an SDN controller based on an industry standard controller like OpenFlow.

What Is NFV?

Network function virtualization is similar to traditional server virtualization mechanisms but clearly focuses on networking services. Within NFV, they’re virtualized network functions. It means NFV separates network functions from routers, firewalls, load balancers and other dedicated hardware devices and allows network services to be hosted on virtual machines. Virtual machines have a manager, which allows multiple operating systems to share a single hardware processor.

SDN vs NFV: What Are the Differences?

Both SDN and NFV rely on software that operates on commodity servers and switches, but both technologies operate at different levels of the network. They are not dependent and you could perfectly have just an NFV platform operating a piece of your environment without the inclusion of full-developed SDN or only SDN. The following figure shows a use case of SDN and NFV.

SDN vs NFV

The differences between SDN vs NFV can be summarized from five aspects. They are presented in the table below.

SDN NFV
Basics SDN separates control and data and centralizes control and programmability of the network. NFV transfers network functions from dedicated appliances to generic servers.
Areas of Operation SDN operates in a campus, data center and/or cloud environment. NFV targets the service provider network.
Initial Application Target SDN software targets cloud orchestration and networking. NFV software targets routers, firewalls, gateways, WAN (wide area network), CDN (content delivery network), accelerators and SLA (service level agreement) assurance.
Protocols OpenFlow. No protocols, yet.
Supporting Organization Open Networking Foundation (ONF). ETSI NFV working group.

 

Challenges in SDN/NFV Implementation

Though SDN and NFV are promising technologies, there are still many roadblocks in their deployments. Complete standards and proven examples are still needed for wider implementation of SDN/NFV.

Security is one of the biggest concerns in implementing SDN. While centralized control and virtualization of network topology are powerful assets that SDN allows, they also create new security vulnerabilities that must be addressed. The positive side of implementing SDN is that the user is able to make uniform security policies across the whole system. But naturally, the negative side is that, if the SDN controller is successfully hacked, the attacker would have complete control of the system.

Another major challenge is the scalability of SDN systems, in the view of the virtualization that comes with the SDN systems (via NFV). It is a fact that the continuous growth of network data consumption makes scalability a challenge for any network system. If integrated properly, SDN can improve the scalability in a given data center or network. But there are scalability concerns raised by the SDN architecture. Since it is a single item, the centralized SDN controller is not necessarily scalable for larger networks. This also presents a single point of failure in the network, which would be dangerous if the controller or an uplink device fails. There are potential solutions to this problem, but these are still in development.

As for NFV implementation, there are challenges for NFV independent software vendors (ISVs). The first challenge is to develop an innovative, virtualized product that meets the reliability and scalability requirements of the telecom industry. In addition to technical challenges, ISVs also have to develop a concise value proposition to convince the large telcos why they should adopt a new, unproven product into their highly complex network operations.

Conclusion

To sum up, when SDN vs NFV, it is no doubt that both of them can bring many benefits to network administrators by accomplishing virtualization and automation of the systems. And it also cannot be denied that there are still many improvements needed to be made for SDN and NFV deployments. Knowing the pros and cons of them can help in correctly facing these technologies and avoid blind following up or complete refusal to new products. FS.COM has announced new 10/40/100GbE open networking switches for data centers and enterprise networks, which support SDN/NFV. Also high performance 40G and 100G DAC and optical transceivers are provided at competitive prices. For more details about SDN switches, please visit www.fs.com or e-mail to sales@fs.com.

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