How to Connect Patch Panel to Switch?

Some people say that patch panel is a waste, and only a network switch matters. Others, however, hold firmly that patch panel is a significant gadget without which you can hardly imagine how the network cabling will look like. As far as I am concerned, we should view it accordingly.

Why We Should Use Patch Panel?

Apart from the easier cable management it provides, its function resembles the railroad switch. And let’s compare the cables to rails to see how it works. With a railroad switch(patch panel), the train(data) can travel from A to B, C and even more destinations, otherwise it can only go from A to B, or C to D. This article, What Is a Patch Panel Used for?, has explained it thoroughly. In addition, FS.COM offers extensive selection of patch panels.

patch panel

How to Connect Patch Panel to Switch?

Having made clear of the function of patch panel and the switch, let’s see together how do they connect in the network cabling in case of mistakes in the layout process. Assume that we have a two 24 port feed through patch panels and two 24 port switch, and all the devices mentioned below. We don’t take the punch down panel here is because it has to be punched down first then to connect the cabling system. If you use a punch down patch panel, the methods and procedures to punch down it have been listed in my previous article—How to Punch Down Cat6 into Patch Panel.

  • Step 1

Find a cabinet large enough to accommodate both the patch panel and switch. And mount the 24 port patch panels and switches all in the same rack. The order from the top to the bottom is like this, patch panel 1, spacer, switch 1, patch panel 2, spacer and switch 2.And prepare the cables in a proper length.

  • Step 2

Prepare the cable in a proper length to avoid the mess.

  • Step 3

Use the top 12 ports on the patch panel for the bottom 12 ports on the switch, and the bottom 12 on the patch panel for the top 12 ports on the switch. The one set of patch cables would be just a bit shorter than the other 12.

  • Step 4

Connect the modulars on the rear side of the patch panel with the cables that go to each unit or room.

OK, congratulation. Now you have a very neat and beautiful cabling system. When powering on, the whole system will work orderly in their own places.

Conclusion

All in all, a patch panel is more of an extension of your Ethernet cables. It’s used for the purpose of neatness and the achievement of data crossover. A switch connects your devices into a network allowing them to communicate and share files with each other. To help you better understand the ways to connect the two, we are planning to produce a video to illustrate the steps in details. You can refer to FS.COM for more information and follow us for the further knowledge.

Patch Panel Recommendations

As a patch panel offers people easy cable management, it has been widely acknowledged by more and more users and expertise. When choosing a patch panel, a lot of factors can be considered, like types and designs. I would like to recommend you patch panels from there perspectives, that is, cabling system, port density, and space saving.

Cabling System of Patch Panel

As we all know, the patch panel used in fiber cabling system is called fiber patch panel and the one used in copper cabling systems named copper patch panel. As far as I am concerned, the fiber patch panel deserves the higher price since it is a lot easier to install. However, copper patch panel can also be your first choice as it is cost-efficient and durable, like the Cat6 patch panel introduced in the next part.

1U High 19″ fiber patch panel is easy to install for better deployment and expand your network for interconnection and cross-connection inside the rack mount and cabinet. It has 24 ports and is available with two adapter types: SC and LC duplex.

Specially designed for Gigabit Ethernet applications, Cat6 Ethernet patch panel meets and even exceeds the TIA/EIA 568 industry specification, and are compatible with all kinds of Cat6 cables and related accessories. Besides, Cat6 patch panels feature high-density and offer the performance required for present and next generation data communications networks and applications.

fiber patch panel

Port Density of Patch Panel

Port density seems to be a main concern when choosing a patch panel. The patch panel with more ports enables more connectivity. Common patch panels are always designed in 8 or 12-port configurations. While high-density patch panels are available in flat and angled designs with 24 or 48 ports configurations. High-density patch panel is suitable for installations with limited space.

Take the Cat6 Ethernet patch panels we mentioned above as an example, as high-density patch panels, they are available in 12-port, 24-port, 48-port configurations, and feature enhanced front and rear labeling mark for easy circuit identification. In addition, the cat6 patch panel provided by FS.COM contains user-friendly number coding and removable rear cable manager which is conducive to uninstall and install.

Cat.6 patch panel

Space Saved by Patch Panel

In general, I, myself, prefer wall mount patch panel to rack mount patch panel, because it is installed above the floor, sparing much space for other equipment standing on the ground.

Wall mount patch panel provided by FS.COM possesses number labeling for easy outlet identification, and is used to provide the critical connection between various fiber cables and optical equipment fixed on the customer’s house or office, offering networking and fiber distribution from the wiring closet to the user’s terminal equipment. Furthermore, it can be fixed quickly and easily to the wall using four screws.

wall mount patch panel

Conclusion

Hope you have saved a lot of time and energy by checking out the list we have above. However, another aspect not mentioned is the budget, as many people would struck in a dilemma that whether to choose a patch panel only for now or the expensive one for future. Considering this, you can first choose what function and performance you actually need, then compare the price of the same type of patch panel between different vendors. Here I can assure you that FS.COM can provide you with best quality and reasonable price. If you have puzzles, please do not hesitate to contact us.

2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch or 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch

In computer networking, an Ethernet switch is a LAN interconnection device that serves as a bridge between multiple equipment and a Local Area Network (LAN). Ethernet switches are categorized into two main types – modular and fixed configuration. Fixed configuration switches have a fixed number of ports and are not expandable. You can select the switches based on number of ports. The larger the network, the greater number of ports you’ll need. Fixed configuration switches are generally available in 5, 8, 10, 16, 24, 28, 48, and 52-port configurations. Some people may question that is it a good idea to purchase two 8-port switches other than one 16-port switch since the price of two 8-port switches is much lower than that of one 16-port switch? 2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch VS 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch—a good question worthy of discussing.

2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch VS 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch

This question is very common and can be subjective according to the urgency of uptime, financial budget, network management and space involved. If most variables are not a problem, then, the answer is YES. Taking two switches from different vendors as an example, there is a wide gap between their price.

S1130-8T2F Managed PoE+ Switch

FS.COM S1130-8T2F managed PoE+ switch comes with 8x 10/100/1000Base-T RJ45 Ethernet ports. It can supply power to network equipment such as weather-proof IP cameras with windshield wiper and heater, high-performance AP and IP telephone. This managed PoE+ switch is highly flexible, the transmission distance of the SFP fiber port can be up to 120km, and with high resistance to electromagnetic interference. It also features superior performance in stability, environmental adaptability and the price of it is $159.

S1130-8T2F Managed PoE+ Switch

Intellinet 16-Port Gigabit Ethernet PoE+ Web-Managed Switch

Intellinet 16-Port gigabit Ethernet PoE+ web-managed switch with 2 SFP ports is sold at $501. Equipped with sixteen Gigabit Ethernet ports, all of which support 802.3at/af Power over Ethernet (PoE/PoE+), this switch can power wireless LAN access points and bridges, VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) telephones, IP surveillance cameras.

Apart from price, there are other elements need to be considered. If the entire network depends on a single switch and, unfortunately the unit undergoes a catastrophic failure, the whole network would break down. However, if one of the 2 switches fails, only half the network is down but still able to limp along until there is a replacement. The only shortcoming is that you will lose two ports by connecting them, which means that you will have a 14-port switch if you buy two 8 ports.

If you need to expand in the future, it’ll be nicer to work with a 16-port switch instead of a couple 8’s. In smaller setups and homes, you can hardly notice the difference between the two, because you seldom have lots of transfers all at the same time and all destined for ports on the opposite switch. While in larger data centers, it can make a difference as you are constricting data flow by forcing 7 ports through one port to get to the other switch.

Conclusion

Gigabit Ethernet transmitting at approximately one gigabit per second, as well as fiber optic cable are all products created in line with people’s desire for faster broadband. Most people turn to gigabit switches as they are easy to use, provide plug and play installations and can save the power consumption. After analyzing the issue—2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch VS 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch, I sincerely hope it can help you make a right choice.

What’s the Difference: Transceiver vs Transmitter

Today, let’s learn and compare two terms in optic communication: transceiver vs transmitter(originated in the early 1920s. Looking up in the dictionary, we can distinguish that transmitter is a device that transmits something(in all senses), and transceiver is a combined transmitter and receiver.

Transmitter

A transmitter can either be a separate piece of electronic equipment or an integrated circuit (IC) within another electronic device. A transmitter generates a radio frequency current applied to the antenna, which in turn radiates radio waves for communication, radar and navigational purposes. The information that is provided to the transmitter is in the form of an electronic signal. This includes audio from a microphone, video from a TV camera, or a digital signal for wireless networking devices. The electronics for a transmitter are simple. They convert an incoming pulse (voltage) into a precise current pulse to drive the source. Different transmitter has different functions. Take the optical transmitter as an example, it consists of the following components: optical source, electrical pulse generator and optical modulator. And the role of it is to convert the electrical signal into optical form, and launch the resulting optical signal into the optical fiber.

Transceiver

A transceiver is a device made up of both a receiver and transmitter (the name “transceiver” is actually short for transmitter-receiver) and these two gadgets are in a single module. When no circuitry is common between transmit and receive functions, the device is a transmitter-receiver.

Transceivers can be found in radio technology, telephony as well as Ethernet in which transceivers are called Medium Attachment Units (MAUs) in IEEE 802.3 documents and were widely used in 10BASE2 and 10BASE5 Ethernet networks. Fiber-optic gigabit, 10 Gigabit Ethernet, 40 Gigabit Ethernet, and 100 Gigabit Ethernet utilize transceivers known as GBIC, SFP, SFP+, QSFP, XFP, XAUI, CXP, and CFP, among which Cisco SFP is the most popular one. In addition, 1000BASE-T SFP, 10GBASE-T SFP+ and 1000BASE-T copper SFP we mentioned before are all transceivers.

third-party-transceiver

Transceiver vs Transmitter

From the above information, we can know that the transmitter can only be used to transmit signals, while the transceiver can both transmit and receive signals. However, many view transceivers as a compromise in terms of performance, functionality, portability and flexibility and if they had any practical value it would be in mobile and portable applications. Transceivers sacrificed some features and performance to gain the smaller size/weight and cost.

As for the portability, a transceiver just needs the space of one module, but functions as two different modules. It is easy to be taken on the go. Separate transmitter is not as convenient in some circumstances as it is probably heavier, and takes up more room. But they are advantageous because each could benefit from its own design, without compromising in areas such as I-F frequency choice, conversion frequencies, and audio stages and they are easier to build and work on.

As far as the price is concerned, in most cases, a separate transmitter consumes more power. And the price of a single transceiver is much lower than that of a transmitter plus a receiver.Using a common frequency generation/tuning scheme, power supply and other components, it costs less to manufacture a transceiver than a separate transmitter and receiver.As to how to choose from them, the answer depends on your application.

Conclusion

You may find many transmitters in you life, like the TV remote control. Although transceiver is not commonly noticed around you, it is actually commonly applied to many places. We can say that it is invisible but versatile. I sincerely hope that this article will help you understand the difference: transceiver vs transmitter, only then, can you use them in the right way.

Which One to Choose? Fiber or Copper Patch Panel?

It seems that you haven’t figured out what a patch panel is. A patch panel is a mounted hardware assembly that contains ports used to connect and manage fiber or copper optic cables going in and out. Patch panels are also known as patch bays, patch fields or jack fields which are usually installed on enclosures or racks to simplify connections. If it breaks down, the entire system may fail. Patch panels can be assorted based on the number of ports they contain. They can be used in fiber and copper cabling systems. Here we have fiber and copper patch panels.

Fiber vs. Copper Patch Panel

Fiber patch panels require two ports for a pair of wires. One port is responsible for the transmitting end while the other looks after the receiving end. The fact that fiber patch panels tend to be faster than copper does not make sense in the condition where the main function of a patch panel is to direct signal traffic, not to send the signal at a particular speed. When installing the panel, a fiber optical cable needs to be split at one end in order to gain access to the individual fibers. The separated fibers are fed into different ports, each of which has a fiber optical adapter. These adapters can then be used to plug individual fibers into other devices. The loss caused by interface may be noticeable. Besides, if the fiber interface doesn’t connect perfectly, you may not get it work successfully.

Copper patch panels have the 110-insulation displacement connector style on one side and 8-pin modular ports on the other. Wires coming into the panel are therefore terminated to the insulation displacement connector. On the opposite side, the 8-pin modular connector plugs into the port which corresponds to the terminated wires. With the copper patch panel, each pair of wires has an independent port. And when the front copper touches the copper in the back, a little bit of the signal is lost but not enough to worry about. And copper is easy to interface- even if the connector doesn’t match perfectly, as long as wire A touches wire B, you get a connection.

Fiber and Copper Patch Panels Provided by FS.COM

1U High 19″ fiber patch panel is easy to install for better deployment and expand your network for interconnection and cross-connection inside the rack mount and cabinet. It has 24 ports and is available with two adapter types: SC and LC duplex.

fiber patch panel

Cat6 patch panels deliver a steady 250 MHz connection to copper Gigabit switches, ideal for Ethernet, Fast Ethernet and Copper Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T) network applications. They are available in 6-port and 8-port module groupings, in 8, 12, 24, and 48-port sizes. The cat6 patch panel provided by FS.COM contains user-friendly number coding and removable rear cable manager which is conducive to uninstall and install. Ordered number coding enables it easy to install and distinct cable. In addition, management bar and numbers are easy for cabling neat, organized and connection identification.

copper patch panel

Conclusion

It is not easy to tell which fiber patch panel is better unless in a given situation. The copper and fiber patch panel both have their own advantages and shortcomings when applied to different systems. FS.COM also provides many kinds of patch panels, each representing a cost-effective solution for your application. And they can adapt to your changes and adds on the equipment.