Server Power Cords Applications in Different Cabling Systems

Each power supply has a separate power cord to support its work. Server power cord connecting the servers and PDU (power distribution unit) plays a critical role in this process. Since the power cords standard for connector types and voltage levels varies from country to country. It’s important to choose the most suitable one for network systems. This post intends to give a simple introduction to server power cords and their applications in different systems.

Power Cords Overview

Usually standard power cords or jumper power cords are available for connection to the server. Power cord consists of three necessary parts: plug, cord and receptacle. And there are many different types of power cords used all over the word. The most commonly seen types are the IEC60320 power cord and NEMA power cord. The former one is often used in US. While the latter is usually seen in North America and other countries that use the standards set by the NEMA.

Among these two types of power cords, the most popular one in some vendors like Dell, HP and IBM is the C13 to C14 power cord. And there are many kinds in this two types of power cords. Here is a simple table showing them.

C14-C13 5-15P – C13
14 to 13 power cord NEMA 15p-C13 power cord
C14-C15 5-15P – C15
C14 to C15 power cord 5-15P - C15 power cord
Applications in Different Cabling System
Cabling for Low Density System

It’s relatively easy to install cords for low density systems. Take servers in a tower configuration for an example. It needs to use a country-specific power cord for direct connection to a facility AC feed. However, server availability goals can require providing redundant AC power to the server in the form of a redundant AC bus or a UPS. The following figure shows two servers connected an UPS with a different types of server power cords. Server in picture A uses C13 to C14 power cord, and server in picture B uses NEMA 5-15P to C13 power cord.

server power cord 1

Note: Connection to a local AC outlet requires an optional country-specific power cord for each power supply. Just shown in picture A above.

Cabling for Medium Density System

Medium density system is a little complex than low density system. Therefore different types and other accessories are maybe needed to achieve an effective power connection. Just shown in the following picture, power connections are achieved using modular PDH, extension bars and C13 to C14 power cord assemblies.

server power cord 2

Note: some servers contain hot-pluggable fans accessible by sliding the chassis out on rails. This means the power cords or jumper cables connecting to the servers must have adequate length and slack to allow chassis movement while staying connected and powered up.

Cabling for High Density System

Compared with the application of power cords in the two systems mentioned above, power cords used in high density systems can be short since cable movement is of little. This following figure shows three kinds of methods to connect enclosures to AC power. The first one shown in the upper area of this figure is that the C13 to C14 power cord is used to connect a single-supply server to a vertical mount PDU, which is suitable for lower-density installations. The second shown in the central area of the figure is to use the C13 x4-to-C20 fixed cord extension bars, a method recommended for extreme-density installations using redundant power supplies. The last one shows the use of a C13 x2-to-C20 Y-cable assembly recommended for connecting a server with dual 1200-watt power supplies directly to a PDU core with C19 outlets.

server power cord 2

Note: Considering there are many cables used in high-density systems, color coding power cords are helpful in systems like that.

Conclusion

Power cords serve as an important bridge in the network device power supply system. FS.COM offers several varieties of IEC power cords, NEMA power cords, and jumper cords for server rack equipment in up to 12 colors with many different types and options for your data center power cords, including: IEC C14 to C13, C20 to C19, C14 to C15, etc. Welcome to visit our website www.fs.com for more information.

Multiple Applications of 1U Detachable Horizontal Cable Management Panel

Good cable management is essential to keep the fiber cables in acceptable condition and ensuring transmission performance with high-density cabling. A 1U detachable horizontal panel is an amazing part in cable management due to its multiple choices for application. This article will introduce the structure of a 1U detachable cable management panel and its diverse applications in network installation.

Structure of the 1U Detachable Cable Management Panel

This 1U detachable horizontal cable management panel consists of four parts that are held together by screws and can be removed by tools. They are illustrated in the following figure, including horizontal laser bar, horizontal laser panel, D-rings and 1U patch panel.

Structure of the 1U Detachable Cable Management Panel

Multiple Application Choices of the Detachable Cable Management Panel

This 1U detachable horizontal cable management panel can be used to manage cables for different active or passive network devices because they can be assembled randomly to meet your needs. Here are four application examples of this detachable cable management panel.

It is a good choice for holding different types of adapter panels. As a whole, this detachable cable management panel can be used with LC adapter panel. Here it is used with four fiber adapter panels with 12 LC duplex single-mode adapters. Besides, taking off part 4, it can also be used with a 12/24-port adapter in 1U patch panel form.

1U adapter panel is used with LC adapter panel

Combining part 2, 3 and 4 mentioned above, it can be used with MTP/MPO adapter panel. Here it is used for four 8 MTP adapter panel. It should be noted that for each MTP/MPO adapter, 8-fiber MTP/MPO connector is also suited to be linked with 12-fiber MTP/MPO connector when only 8 fibers are used in the 12-fiber MTP/MPO (such as in 40G network).

1U detachable panel is used with MTP adapter panel

By using only part 2 and part 3, cable management for a 1U rack mount fiber enclosure is perfectly achieved.

1U detachable panel is used with enclosure

The combination in the last example can also be used to manage cables coming from 1U WDM Mux/Demux or switch. In the following figure, on the top this detachable panel is used with a 18 channels CWDM Mux/Demux and at the bottom it is used with a switch.

1U detachable panel is used with CWDM Mux/Demux and switch

Conclusion

From the application examples presented above, we can see that this 1U detachable horizontal cable management panel is very capable in different cabling situations. You may notice that cable ties are also used to help organize the cables placing inside the D-rings. If you interested in this multifunctional assembly, you can find it on our site (FS.COM). You can also find many other helpful cable management assemblies for managing efficiently high-density structured cabling in your data centers and telecommunication rooms.

The following table displays some details of several cable management devices provided by us They are all in stock at Seattle warehouse and are available for same-day shipping.

Picture Description
cable management-1 1U Detachable Horizontal Panel with D-ring & Lacing Bar
cable management-2 1U Plastic Single-side Horizontal Cable Management Panel with Finger Duct
cable management-3 24 Ports UTP Cat5e 110 Punch Down 1U 19” Fast Ethernet Patch Panel
cable management-4 1U Metal Horizontal Lacer Panel with D-rings

Protecting Cable Harness With Wire Loom

No matter where your cables are set, keeping them in good protection is always helpful for extending the cable service life. As we know, it is more difficult to arrange the harness cable due to the multiple strings. However, a better protection and management is necessary all the time. Thus, a cable manager named wire loom is designed to meet the demands. This device efficiently arranges and protects the cables at the same time. A growing number of applications are adopting the wire looms for harness cable routing.

What Is Wire Loom?

Wire loom, also known as convoluted tube, is a corrugated pipe-shaped cable organizer widely used for cable harness protection. Wire loom can be made of several materials, such as polyamide (PA), polyester (PET), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE), polyurethane (PUR) and elastomer. You can find the applications of wire loom in a variety of industries, including automotive, agriculture, construction, marine and telecommunications. The inside diameter of wire loom is also optional to suit the size of cables, and common diameters are 3/8”, 1/4”, 3/4”, 1/2”, 1” etc. The following picture shows the general look of wire looms.

wire loom

How to Choose Wire Loom?

There are three aspects that you can consider when selecting the wire loom. Firstly, you can look over the design of wire loom to decide whether it needs to be split, non-split, spiral wrap or self-wrapping. Typically, split wire looms are the standard type preferred by most applications. Secondly, as mentioned above, the size of wire loom is optional, thus you need to choose the right size to fit your wires. You can measure the wire bundle diameter in advance and then make sure the wire loom to be a little larger than the wire bundle. Thirdly, you should select the wire loom material based on the installation environment so as to give better protection for the cables. Temperature, moisture, chemical, vibration and other elements can all be taken into consideration during the selection.

Benefits of Wire Loom

It is surly a cost-effective solution to use wire loom for cable harness protection. The install and removal of wire loom is very flexible and easy, especially for split wire loom. Most importantly, wire loom is resistant to various abrasions (friction, vibration, fraying and puncture), fluids (automotive fluids, water, snow, salt and ice) and weathers ( heat, cold and sunlight). Apart from these, using the wire loom also ensures the cable management to be neat and clean, which is important to the higher performance of cables.

Related Wire Loom Products

Besides the standard wire looms, there are also other related products that can provide easier wire loom deployment.

Colored Wire Loom

The typical color for a wire loom is black, but there are also other color choices, such as red, white, blue, yellow and so on. These colored wire looms can be seem as the ornament for the installation area, especially when the they are used at people’s houses. In addition, it is simpler to distinguish different cable bundles when multiple wire looms are used in the same place.

colored wire looms

Wire Loom Connector

Wire loom connector, namely wire loom tee, is used to offer safe branching of cables. It can connect three pieces of wire looms with a simple snap. The nylon and TPE rubber material designs secure the junction area to be protected from high temperature and abrasion. Different branch diameters are also available within one connector to provide convenience for the connection of different sized wire looms.

wire loom coonector

Conclusion

If you are seeking for a better protection for your cable harness, wire loom is an ideal solution that can be used for all kinds of cabling applications. FS.COM provides different colors and sizes of wire looms and wire loom connectors. Please visit our website for more detailed information if interested.

How to Organize Cables With J-Hook?

When managing large amount of cables, using a cabling pathway is very useful to provide better support for the cables. Common pathway systems are usually structured with conduits, cable trays, ladder racks, surface raceways, and underfloor ducting systems. Construction materials can be made of steel, aluminum, fiber glass or plastic. However, it is not that necessary to lay every inch of cable on top of a support element. Lots of pathway materials can be saved for other important applications. Is there any solution can both save the construction material and provide continuous support for the cables? The answer is yes. J-hook system perfectly solves the issue with greater flexibility and simpler installation. This article is going to present some basic information about J-hook.

What Is a J-Hook?

The name of J-hook comes from its side view of the letter “J” with a semi-circular bottom section. Cables can be put in the rounded gaps between J-hooks for a continuous support. J-hook is also designed with smooth beveled edges which provides a large bending radius for cables. It is widely used for indoor and outdoor applications providing a speedy and easy installation.

j-hook

Common Attachments of J-Hook

J-hook can be fitted with many kinds of attachments allowing for a more flexible use. The followings are some common fitting types for wall-mount J-hook.

J-Hook With Angle Bracket

Using the 90-degree angle bracket, J-hook can be fastened onto the ceiling. It is also an effective solution for cable trays. This attachment can be easily installed or removed as you want.

J-Hook With Beam Clamp

This attachment can install J-hook to the horizontal flanges with the knock-on beam clamp. It allows for up to 1/8 inch flange thickness. In addition, J-hook with beam clamp is able to rotate 360 degrees to support all directional cable runs.

J-Hook With Hammer-On Clip

Hammer-on clip attachment fitting can be quickly installed with only a hammer. It is also able to swivel 360 degrees for various directional runs of cable.

J-Hook With Wire/Rod Clip

Wire/rod clip is also known as bat wing clip due to its bat shape. It attaches the J-hook to a wide variety of structures. The clip can snap onto the wire that holds up ceiling grids, thus the cable can be suspended at any position in a plenum space.

j-hook-attachment

Steps for J-Hook Installation
  • Step 1, fasten J-hook with the right attachment. It depends on where the J-hook is located. Wall, stud, beam, flange and drop-wire mounting are the common supporting structures.
  • Step 2, align snap lock attachment of J-hook with holes of the chosen bracket and snap J-hook into position.
  • Step 3, lay the cable in J-hooks. The intervals between J-hooks is around 1.2 to 1.5 m.
  • Step 4, look over your installation to ensure the cables are neatly laid on the J-hooks.
Benefits of J-Hook

Compared with traditional pathway elements, J-hook is easier to install and move on-site without the need for special tools. A variety of attachment types enable the flexibility of J-hook to be placed at different locations. There is more headroom capability when using J-hooks. Its wide-base design also maintains the bend radius of large diameter cables.

Conclusion

J-hook is absolutely a simpler solution for horizontal cabling support. Different from other continuous support systems, J-hook system is more economical with fewer logistical demands, less installation labor and reduced material cost. Since it can be used in multiple environments and applications, more and more cabling projects have been adopting J-hook system for construction.

Suggestions for High-Density Cable Management

People who work in data centers are familiar with cable management. Terrible cable management destroys the stability and availability of networking, especially for high-density applications. Since the advancement of technology brings us to a higher broadband network, high-density components are widely applied to data infrastructures. The importance of high-density cable management should be valued.

Useful High-Density Components

Using the right devices for high-density connections will ease the difficulty of cable management. High-density patch panels, high-density TAB patch cables and high-density trunk cables are recommended for high-density installations.

High-density patch panels provide fast, intuitive and easy deployment of high-density interconnects and cross-connects in data centers. They also conserve valuable rack space. Compared to standard patch panels, angled styles can facilitate cable management practices. Omitting the necessity of buying new components, reconfigurable panels with various mounting and attachment features can ensure that patch panels are fit for your data center configuration. For instance, the following picture shows an ultra high-density angled patch panel with 144 ports highly welcomed by high-density network application.

high-density-patch-panels

High-density cabling has been increased because of the deployment of higher network speeds. Installing cables with smaller overall diameter into dense patch cord trays can save lots of space to improve cable management. These high-density patch cables also provide better airflow to maintain consistent operating temperatures, reducing the likelihood of failure or downtime. Finger access to each patch cable becomes more difficult as cable density increases. To ensure easy access, looking for high-density patch cords that are easy to remove is important. Thus, the patch cable using a flexible pull-tab efficiently solves the issue. These tabs can help increase cabling density and maintain reliability, preventing you from accidentally loosening surrounding connectors as you access the patch cable you need. The picture below is a typical HD TAB fiber patch cable.

high-density-patch-cable

High-density trunks allow tighter trunk cable bends for slack storage and routing. Less space is consumed and installation is easier when using high-density trunks that offer smaller transitions. Cable pulling and cable management are improved when a cable with a smaller overall diameter is used. High-density trunks should also be marked for fast fiber type identification.

high-density-trunks

Things to Avoid During Installation & Daily Practices

Point one, avoid over-bundling the cables or placing multiple bundles on top of each other, which can degrade performance of the cables underneath. Additionally, keep fiber and copper runs separated. The weight of the copper cables can crush fiber cables that are placed underneath.

Point two, avoid routing cables through pipes and holes. This may limit additional future cable runs.

Point three, avoid mounting cabling components in locations that block access to other equipment inside and outside the racks. For example, blocking the cooling fans will restrict airflow.

Point four, avoid leaving loose cables on the floor; this is a major safety hazard. Use the horizontal, vertical, or overhead cable managers.

Point five, avoid exposing cables to direct sunlight and areas of condensation.

Point six, avoid mixing different cable types within a bundled group.

Summary

In conclusion, a good cable management of high-density devices is very essential to extend their service life. Choose the right components will also facilitate the efficiency of cable management. There is no perfect solution for all your cable management demands. Some suggestions may help you to a certain degree, but you should still arrange your equipment according to the actual environment.