Single-mode Fiber Patch Cable VS Multi-mode Fiber Patch Cable

Fiber patch cable, also called fiber optic jumper or fiber optic patch cord, is designed to interconnect or cross connect fiber networks within structured cabling systems. The connectors capped at either end of the fiber patch cable allow it to be rapidly and conveniently connected to an optical switch, cable television (CATV) or other telecommunication equipment. Depending on transmission medium, the fiber patch cable can be classified into single-mode fiber patch cable and multimode patch cord.

What is Single mode Fiber Patch Cable

Single-mode fiber patch cable, which is generally yellow, is composed of a fiber optic cable terminated with single mode fiber optic connectors at both ends. It is usually used for connections over large areas, such as college campuses and cable television networks. Compared with multimode fiber patch cable, single-mode fiber patch cable have a higher bandwidth. The following figure shows the common single-mode fiber patch cable which is with blue connectors at both ends.

single mode

What is Multimode Patch Cord

Multimode fiber patch cable, which is generally orange or grey, is composed of a fiber optic cable terminated with multimode fiber optic connectors at both ends. Its connectors are generally cream or black (as shown below). It is a type of optical fiber mostly employed for communication over short distances, such as within a building or on the campus. Due to its high capacity and high reliability, multimode optical fiber is used for building the backbone network application.

multimode patch cord

Difference between Single-mode and Multimode Fiber Patch Cables

The main difference between single-mode and multi-mode fiber patch cables is the size of their respective cores.

Single-mode fiber optic patch cables use 9/125 (“9” represents the diameter of the core, and “125” represents the diameter of the cladding) micron bulk single-mode fiber cables. The most common type of single-mode fiber has a core diameter of 8 to 10 microns. In single-mode cables, light travels toward the center of the core in a single wavelength, allowing the signal to travel faster and over longer distances without a loss of signal quality than is possible with multimode cabling.

Multimode patch cord uses 62.5/125 (“62.5” represents the diameter of the core, and “125” represents the diameter of the cladding) micron or 50/125 (“50” represents the diameter of the core, and “125” represents the diameter of the cladding) micron multimode fiber cables. In other words, the core of the multimode fiber patch cable is either 50 or 62.5 microns. Compared with single-mode cable, the larger core of the multimode cable gathers more light, and this light reflects off the core and allows more signals to be transmitted. Although it is more cost-effective than single-mode cable, the multimode cabling does not maintain signal quality over long distances.

Both single-mode fiber patch cable and multimode patch cord can be used in computer workstation to outlet and patch panels or optical cross connect distribution center. A large number of fiber optic patch cables are supplied by Fiberstore, including the above said single-mode and multimode fiber patch cables.

Related Articles:
Single Mode vs Multimode Fiber: What’s the Difference?
The Advantages and Disadvantages of Optical Fiber

Fiber Optics Based on Multi Point Fiber Distribution Systems

Multi point distribution system is the broad wireless technology used to deliver voice, data, Internet, and video services. It has been allocated for that deliever broadband services in a point to point or point to multi point configuration to residential and commercial customers. As a result of the propagating characteristics of signals so that the systems use a cellular like network architecture, though services provided are fixed, not mobile.

In some cases fiber distribution systems have an ability to connect several remote sites to one base station. One common application is that the repeaters based on a major building and others building such as RF shielding areas and basement which all located in a few miles repeater building. A and the repeater use the head end. A multiple fiber optic transceiver assembly at the base station is commonly called a “head end” The distance end of the fiber is called “remote hub” equipment.

fiber distribution systems

We need to pay attention to that each fiber optic receiver output at the repeater site has individual pads to reduce the composite noise floor. For example, if used the 40dB, an additional 80 dB of combiner port-to-port isolation occurs. In real application, it is a good idea, including regard the taps at test point to read the RF levels. Just used for testing and protection. A similar system that when we used the WDM, if the numbers of fibers are reduced by 50% but a WDM must be added at each remote site and another WDM for each fiber added at the repeater site. In the 4 remote site example, it would be taking 8 WDM’s to operate all the fibers full duplex and 4 fiber optic transmitters would have to be 1550nm models. Then there also a point we need to be careful. Fiber optic transceiver is not frequency selective and the same unit can receive 1330 or 1550nm optical signals equally well. We also measured the noise performance and we are happy to inform you that in line with theory, optic splitters practically do not add any noise. No matter what output we tested, this means that your receiver connected to such network would also show very high quality readings.

When we use the fiber optic links in the fiber distribution system, sometimes we need fiber optical splitter to split the signal which carried. The systems designer has the choice of splitting either the optical or RF domain. The function of optical splitter is familiar to RF splitter. Other parts of the incoming fiber optic network are connected to the transmission of output, and the terminal device is connected and the another main part is its direct part. There are also splitters that divided the input into 2, 4 or more outputs. According to the structure and locations of fiber optic splitter, in the fiber optic network, we need different split ratios of splitter, such as 1×2, 1×4 and 1×8 splitter and so on. Moreover unused single mode fiber cable, specific products can see at 50m single mode, it also can strengthen the signal used for the RF over fiber systems between the connected buildings for data communication and spare fibers.

Some Notes Of Buying Fiber Pigtails

In any fiber optic cable installation, the way the cables are attached to the system–is vital to the success of the telecommunications network. If done well, the connection allows optical signals to pass with low attenuation and little return loss. One of the proven ways to join optical fibers is with a fiber pigtail–a fiber cable with a installed connector on one end and unterminated fiber on the other end.

Pigtails are basically cable assemblies. Ninety-nine percent of singlemode applications use pigtails, also used in many multimode applications. One of the benefits of using pigtail is lower labor costs. The end of the pigtail is stripped back and fusion spliced to another single fiber. This is done easy in field with a multi-fiber trunk to break out the multi-fibers cable into its component for connection to the end equipment. Installers working with singlemode fiber typically have access to a fusion splicer–an expensive piece of equipment that costs $6000 to $30,000 or more. With a fusion splicer you just splice the pigtail right onto the cable in a minute or less.

Pigtails bridge a critical junction in the fiber-optic network. Pigtails consist of–a connector, a ferrule, standard fiber and jacket types, including singlemode and multimode varieties. The most important element you should know is that the quality of the connector itself. You need to know certain characteristics, such as insertion loss, the type of polish used and how well the connector is terminated to the cable. As fiber cable termination is the addition of connectors to each optical fiber in a cable. The fibers need to have connectors fitted before they can attach to other equipment. Two common solutions for fiber cable termination are pigtails and fanout kits or breakout kits.

Ferrule material, whether zirconia ceramic, plastic or stainless steel, must also be specified when buying a pigtail. If you go with a metal ferrule, it is a waste for any singlemode application.

The length of the pigtail is another element that must be specified. The extra slack allows for splicing errors to be corrected, without it, you may have to start with another pigtail.

Pigtails can have female connectors and be mounted in a wall mount or patch panel, often in pairs although single-fiber solutions exist, to allow them to be connected to endpoints or other fiber runs with patch cables. Alternatively they can have male connectors and plug directly into an optical device. Pigtails are different from patch cords, as both ends with connectors, like common patch cord LC-LC.

Testing a pigtail in the field is not easy. The unterminated end is difficult to check until the pigtail is actually spliced to the equipment.
Quality is typically high because the connectorized end is attached in a controlled environment–FiberStore. FiberStore can make singlemode pigtails more accurately than a field termination can be done.

Fiber Optic Patch Cord Wiki

Fiber Optic Patch Cord Wikipedia

Patch cord wikipedia defines that Fiber optic patch cord (Fiber Patch Cable or Fiber jumper) are used for linking the equipment and components in the fiber optic network, is a fiber cable that has fiber connectors installed on one or both ends. The fiber optic patch cord types are classfied by the fiber optic connector types. For example, LC fiber optic patch cord means this cable is with LC fiber optic connector. There are PC, UPC, APC type of fiber patch cord types, different from each other because of the polish of fiber connectors. Fiber optic connectors are designed and polished to different shapes to minimize back reflection. This is particularly important in single mode applications. Typical back reflection grades are -30dB, -40dB, -50dB and -60dB. General use of these cable assemblies includes the interconnection of fiber cable systems and optics-to-electronic equipment.

Fiber patch cords are made of 2 major parts: optical connector and fiber optic cable. If the fiber connectors are attached to only one end of a cable, it is known as a fiber optic pigtail. If the fiber connectors are attached to both ends, it is known as a fiber jumper or fiber patch cord.

Fiber optic patch cords types are also commonly divided into single mode fiber optic patch cords and multimode patch cord. Here the word “mode” means the transmitting mode of the fiber optic light in the fiber optic cable core. usually, single mode fiber optic patch cable is with 9/125 fiber glass and is yellow jacket color, multimode fiber optic patch cables are with 50/125 or 62.5/125 fiber glass and is orange color.

Fiber Cable Structure

1. Simplex fiber optic patch cables: Simplex fiber patch cable has one fiber and one connector on each end.

2. Duplex fiber optic patch cables: Duplex fiber patch cable has two fibers and two connectors on each end. Each fiber is marked “A” or “B” or different colored connector boots are used to mark polarity.

3. Ribbon fan-out cable assembly: For ribbon fan-out cable assembly, one end is ribbon fiber with multi fibers and one ribbon fiber connector such as MTP connector (12 fibers), the other end is multi simplex fiber cables with connectors such as ST, SC, LC, etc.

Below is an example color scheme for patch cables.
fiber optic patch cord wikipedia types
Availabilities of Fiber Optic Patch Cord Types:
-Full specifications, FC, SC, ST, LC, MTRJ, E2000, DIN, D4, SMA, etc.
-Simplex and Duplex assemblies available -Singlemode and multimode available
-PC, UPC and APC polishing available
-Hybrid patch cords are available upon request
-Fan-out available (Ribbon type/bundle type)
-Pigtail available -Loopback available
-Customized lengths upon request

Applications of Different Fiber Optic Patch Cord Types:
FTTH application
Premise installations
Data processing networks
Wide Area Networks (WANs)
Telecommunication networks
Industrial, mechanical and military

Conclusion 

Based on patch cord wikipedia, we have a good understanding of patch cords. FS.COM provides a comprehensive line of different fiber optic patch cord types, such as OM3 and OM4  multimode fiber cable and OS2 single mode fiber. Want to know more about our fiber patch cord types, please visit FS.COM.

Related Article:
The Advantages and Disadvantages of Optical Fiber
What Kind of Fiber Patch Cord Should I Choose?

Ethernet And Fiber Optic Cabling

Even in the age of WiFi and high speed cellular networks, we still need networking cables to together our computing hardware together. Both Ethernet cables and fiber optic cables are used to deliver and distribute communications. Offering a fast, secure and reliable connection, these cables play different roles in delivering critical entertainment and business data.

Ethernet Cable
Originally developed by Xerox in the 1970s, Category 5 and 6 cables, or Cat 7 cable connect computers and gaming systems to routers in our homes and offices. Recognized by their large locking RJ45 plastic connectors and resembling over-sized phone wires, these cables carry data measured in the hundreds of megabits per second. These multi-conductor cables also connect routers to modems and switches, depending on a network’s configuration.

Ethernet data rates vary depending on the cable used. The newest Cat 7 cable, 10 Gigabit Ethernet, transmits up to 10 Gbps. Category 7 technology improves both internal signaling and exterior shielding compared to older CAT5 / CAT5e and CAT6 cables. CAT 7 cable supports 10 Gigabit Ethernet network connections, and CAT7 cables are also compatible with standard Ethernet adapters.Gigabit Ethernet transmits up to 1 Gbps. Fast Ethernet, still the most common cable used in homes and offices today, transmits up to 100 Mbps (approximately 0.1 Gbps).

Fiber Optic Cable
Fiber optic cable’s primary claim to fame is its ability to carry vast amounts of data over considerable distances. Fiber optic wiring is normally found leading from an Internet service provider’s central distribution center to individual localized hubs in a neighborhood. Amazingly, this data is carried along glass or plastic fibers as light. Depending on whether the Internet service is DSL or cable-based, phone wires or coaxial cable then lead to each address. Fiber optic cable retrofits have enabled service providers to offer higher speeds and increased data throughput. Signals on fiber optic cables are typically repeated or boosted to compensate for signal losses over distance.

At distances up to 1.86 miles, single-mode fiber-optic cable can transmit data up to 10 Gbps, but it is used primarily for video. It is used primarily for high-bandwidth video or as a backbone to connect networks between buildings. Multimode fiber, which is used for voice, data, and video, has a data rate up to 1 Gigabit per second for distances under 1.24 miles.

Multifiber Push-On (“MPO”) fiber trunks (like MPO to LC cable) have become the default cabling solution to these ever-increasing data center bandwidth requirements. Because they are a natural fit for parallel optics, these fiber links are compact, pre-terminated, able to handle bandwidth all the way up to 100 Gbps, and even plug and play by design.

People always think fiber optic cable would beat copper Ethernet cable hands down. However, cable manufacturers have continued to update the technology behind Ethernet, meaning it can be just as fast as some fiber optic cables today. For example, Cat 7 cable is a next-generation standard cabling technology transmits up to 10 Gbps. While Ethernet cable and fiber optic cable are completely different, fiber optic cable can be used in Ethernet networks. Ehernet cable price and fiber optic cable price are also not the same, choosing Ethernet cable or fiber optic cable you should take it into consideration.