Ethernet Switch vs Splitter—How Much Do You Know?

Today, our lives hardly do without Internet communication. We do shopping, letter writing and business all relying on the Ethernet connections both at home and office. And Gigabit Ethernet switch and splitter are the networking devices that are primarily used for connecting different computers or other networking devices. However, they are quite different. Here focus on Ethernet switch vs splitter.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter: What Are They?

First, let’s figure out the definitions of the two terms.

What Is Ethernet Switch?

An Ethernet switch is a high speed networking device that provides more ports for subnets to connect more computers, printers, cameras and so on in a building or campus. Through the ports, the data switch can receive incoming data packets and redirects the data to their intended destination within a LAN. Usually, an Ethernet switch not only works at the data link layer which is also called layer 2, but also can operate at the network layer (layer 3) or above.

What Is Splitter?

A network splitter acts as the optical power distribution device, like a coaxial cable transmission system. It’s one of the most important passive devices which means it doesn’t need external power except for light. As the name implies that it can split a single Internet connection to create extra connections, as a result the additional or other computers on a network could be connected.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter: What Are the Differences?

Ethernet switch can be used for networks that include different devices, for example, a computer and a video game console or a printer. In addition, general switch needs a power input so that it can divide an Ethernet signal into various signals, and the signals can operate at the same time. As a result, different devices can be connected by the switch and work simultaneously.

As for Ethernet splitter, there is no need for power input. And splitters need to be used in pairs. It physically splits a single Ethernet connection into two connections. Simply put, if you want to connect two computers in one room and a switch in another room, then you need the splitters. Instead of using two Ethernet cables from one room to another, the splitters can physically split one Ethernet cable into two to connect the computers and the switch. This is the main principle for the issue that how to use Ethernet splitter.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter: Where to buy?

The following products of Ethernet splitter vs switch are from FS.COM.

S5800-48F4S Switch

This is a 10gb Ethernet switch that has 48×1GbE SFP ports and 4×10GbE SFP+ ports. With a switching capacity of 176Gbps, it supports comprehensive L2 and L3 network management features. The switch offers MLAG, MPLS, IPv4/IPv6, SNMP etc. Designed with the max power draw of 75W and switching capacity of 176Gbps, this switch is ideal for traditional or fully virtualized data center.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter-switch

Figure 1: S5800-48F4S Switch

Conlusion

As for Ethernet switch vs splitter, we have known how do Ethernet splitters work and how do switch work. Both of them can optimize our network that allow us to work in an efficient and high secure way. Welcome to visit FS.COM to pick your own Ethernet switch and splitter.

What Is Redundant Link between Switches?

We know that if any chain in the network fails, the operation may break down. Facing this problem, we’ve introduced the stackable switches and together with it is the concept of redundant links. When stacking switches, except the shortest link between switch and the main frame computer, we also prepare other links in case of the break down of the major link. The other links are redundant links between switches.

Introduction of Redundant Link

In order to maintain the stability of the network, composed of multiple switches, some backup connections are usually used to improve the robustness and stability of the network. The backup connection here is also called a backup link or a redundant link. Redundant links in a switches are accomplished through the use of multiple switches or multiple links between switches.

In an enterprise network, a link is redundant if its presence or absence does not affect the nature of the mechanism. That is, even if we remove that link, the mechanism will behave in the same manner.
Redundant link between switches

Pros and Cons of Redundant Link

Pros

The redundancy in networks can improve its reliability. Our intention is that if one device fails, another can automatically take over. By adding a little bit of complexity, we try to reduce the probability that a failure in switch will take the whole network down. Spanning Tree Protocol,the redundancy protocols, can be implemented on any topology or mesh. The Cellular Redundancy provides alternative to running a physical line for redundancy. In addition, with Parallel Redundancy Protocol, we can achieve zero packet loss, “0ms” recovery. And it can be added to any existing network.

Cons

But you cannot have both complexity and reliability at the same time. The more complex something is, the harder it is to maintain, the greater the chance of human error, and the greater the chance of a software bug causing a new failure mode.

The switches between the backup links are often connected to each other to form a loop. The loops can be redundant to a certain extent. The redundant backup of the links can bring robustness, stability and reliability to the network. However, the backup link also causes loops in the network. The loop problem is the most serious problem faced by the backup link. The loop between the switches will cause new network problems: broadcast storm, loops and duplicate frames.

Tips

To make fully use of redundant links, we can minimize the complexity. Select two identical switches as the core switches. If you need gigabit Ethernet switch, for example, you can select two 10 gbe switches that run the same software and have the same connections. We can also introduce the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) which was developed as a Layer 2 loop-avoidance mechanism for redundant links in a switched network. With STP, there will be only one logical path between all destinations on the network and redundant links that could cause a loop are intentionally blocked.

Conclusion

Redundant links are useful to a great extent. That’s why so many people now choose stackable switches rather than standalone ones to maintain the efficient network operation. Stackable switches are now our star products and focal point. We would like to introduce our high quality fiber switch to every people in need of reliable network performance.