The Truth About Single Mode Fiber Types

OS1 and OS2 single mode fibers are the essential communication medium that works by delivering optical signals in extremely pure glass or plastic fiber. However, for the layperson, all fiber cables look like the same, with differences hidden in their dimensions. But if you study deeper, there are countless changes between them, such as the performance, cost and so on. And choosing the right fiber optic cable is also critical. In this post, I’d like to focus on single mode fiber types.

What Is Single Mode Fiber?

Single mode fiber optic cable is a type of fiber optic cable, which features a core diameter of nominally 9µm. This is the most basic difference between single mode and multimode fibers. Due to its small diameter, there’s only one transmission mode of light. Thus, compared with the multimode fiber, single mode fiber prohibits light reflection so that attenuation of signal could be reduced and offers the highest transmission speed. As a result, light in single mode fiber can go further, which means its transmission distance is longer. In addition, the core number of single mode fiber includes 24, 48, 72, 96 and so on. And you can customize the fiber product with the specific core number.

single mode fiber types on patch panel

Figure: Single mode fibers are connected in a patch panel.

Single Mode Fiber Types: OS1 VS OS2

OS1 and OS2 fiber are the two single mode fiber types that are generally well known today.

What Is OS1?

OS1 is an indoor cable that uses the tight buffered cable construction. And this single mode fiber is compliant with all ITU-T G.652 standards including ITU-T G.652A, ITU-T G.652B, ITU-T G.652C, ITU-T G.652D. In general, the maximum attenuation of OS1 can achieve 1.0 dB/km.

What Is OS2?

OS2 is an outdoor loose tube fiber optic cable. It’s widely used in outdoor applications where the cabling process applies no stress to the optical cables. Unlike OS1, OS2 cables just meet the ITU-T G.652C or ITU-T G.652D standards. And the maximum attenuation of OS2 is 0.4 dB/km. Therefore, the maximum transmission distance of OS2 is much longer than that of OS1, and OS2 fiber optic cable price is higher than OS1.

OS1 VS OS2: Differences

The difference between OS1 and OS2 are quite clear. They have different construction, standards, attenuation and transmission distance. As a result, OS1 and OS2 are applied in different applications. OS1 is commonly used in a campus or data center, whereas OS2 is applied in outdoor constructions like the street etc.

How to Choose Single Mode Fiber Types

Knowing single mode fiber types can help us to choose the suitable fiber cable. Transmission distance is always the most important part when buying the cable. Besides, fiber optic cables price is also very critical when making the final choice. When you need fibers for indoors application, choose OS1. And choose OS2 for outdoors uses. However, considering that there’s not a big difference between OS1 and OS2 price and future’s network upgrade, I recommend you choose the OS2 fiber which has better performance. The following is single mode fiber optic cable price comparison between FS.COM and another vendor.

OS2 Types
FS Price(USD)
C2G(USD)
LC to LC Duplex (1m)
2.8
42.99
LC to SC Duplex (1m)
2.8
32.99
SC to SC Duplex (1m)
2.8
38.99
LC to LC Simplex (1m)
1.4
39.99
LC to SC Simplex (1m)
1.4
21.99
SC to SC Simplex (1m)
1.4
21.99

We can see, FS.COM offers OS2 fibers with reasonable price and good quality.

Conclusion

OS1 and OS2 are the two single mode fiber types used in telecommunication infrastructure. When you decide to buy single mode fiber cables, consider the transmission distance and price based on your actual need. FS.COM offers you fiber products with good quality and favorable price. For further information on optical fiber products, please contact us via sales@fs.com.

How to Organize Fiber Cables With J-Hook?

When managing large amount of fiber cables, using a cabling pathway is very useful to provide better support for the cables. Common pathway systems are usually structured with conduits, cable trays, ladder racks, surface raceways, and underfloor ducting systems. Construction materials can be made of steel, aluminum, fiber glass or plastic. However, it is not that necessary to lay every inch of cable on top of a support element. Lots of pathway materials can be saved for other important applications. Is there any solution can both save the construction material and provide continuous support for the cables? The answer is yes. J-hook system perfectly solves the issue with greater flexibility and simpler installation. This article is going to present some basic information about J-hook.

What Is a J-Hook?

The name comes from its side view of the letter “J” with a semi-circular bottom section. Cables can be put in the rounded gaps between J-hooks for a continuous support. J-hook is also designed with smooth beveled edges which provides a large bending radius for fiber cable. It is widely used for indoor and outdoor applications providing a speedy and easy installation.

j-hook

Common Attachments of J-Hook

J-hook can be fitted with many kinds of attachments allowing for a more flexible use. The followings are some common fitting types for wall-mount J-hook.

J-Hook With Angle Bracket

Using the 90-degree angle bracket, J-hook can be fastened onto the ceiling. It is also an effective solution for cable trays. This attachment can be easily installed or removed as you want.

J-Hook With Beam Clamp

This attachment can install J-hook to the horizontal flanges with the knock-on beam clamp. It allows for up to 1/8 inch flange thickness. In addition, J-hook with beam clamp is able to rotate 360 degrees to support all directional cable runs.

J-Hook With Hammer-On Clip

Hammer-on clip attachment fitting can be quickly installed with only a hammer. It is also able to swivel 360 degrees for various directional runs of cable.

J-Hook With Wire/Rod Clip

Wire/rod clip is also known as bat wing clip due to its bat shape. It attaches the J-hook to a wide variety of structures. The clip can snap onto the wire that holds up ceiling grids, thus the cable can be suspended at any position in a plenum space.

j-hook-attachment

Steps for J-Hook Installation
  • Step 1, fasten J-hook with the right attachment. It depends on where the J-hook is located. Wall, stud, beam, flange and drop-wire mounting are the common supporting structures.
  • Step 2, align snap lock attachment of J-hook with holes of the chosen bracket and snap J-hook into position.
  • Step 3, lay the cable in J-hooks. The intervals between J-hooks is around 1.2 to 1.5 m.
  • Step 4, look over your installation to ensure the cables are neatly laid on the J-hooks.
Benefits of J-Hook

Compared with traditional pathway elements, J-hook is easier to install and move on-site without the need for special tools. A variety of attachment types enable the flexibility of J-hook to be placed at different locations. There is more headroom capability when using J-hooks. Its wide-base design also maintains the bend radius of large diameter cables.

Conclusion

J-hook is absolutely a simpler solution for horizontal cabling support. Different from other continuous support systems, J-hook system is more economical with fewer logistical demands, less installation labor and reduced material cost. Since it can be used in multiple environments and applications, more and more cabling projects have been adopting J-hook system for construction.