Importance of Plug Boot For RJ45 Cables

Ethernet cables with RJ45 connectors are widely applied to our life. When choosing the RJ45 cables, you may discover that these cables have different appearances of their cable plugs. For example, some cables will have a rubber thing on the clip while some don’t. Why do RJ45 cables have such design and what is the function? This post is going to present the basic knowledge about the special design.

What Is Plug Boot?

This rubber thing is known as plug boot. A booted cable has the plug boot on the cable end of the connector. You can find two main types of boots on the market. One is the separate boot that can be purchased individually to put on the cable, and the other is the injection molded boot to be bought together with the cable. Of course, the latter is more stronger to provide support for the cable when the connector is being pulled out of a switch, patch panel or other devices. Non-booted cables will not have the plug boot as the protection, which are easier to be damaged.

booted cable

Functions of Plug Boot

Generally speaking, the boot design has two purposes. Firstly, the plug boot can prevent the connector clip from flipping up or even breaking off from the cable. When the plastic clip is broken, cable won’t be able to firmly connect to the network which will then interrupt the data transaction. Secondly, using the booted cable is also a protection for your own nails. Because the clip is slim and small, it is easy to stick into the nails during the installation or removal of RJ45 cable. Hence, for the better protection of both cable connector and your nails, Ethernet cables with plug boots are a great solution.

Several Types of Boots

If you want to buy the booted cables, you should also consider which type of boot is best fit for your network since plug boot also has different constructions. Here will introduce the common types of plug boots.

Standard Boot

The standard boot looks like the half of a dome. It protects the clip on all sides and prevents it from snagging or breaking off. This is the type widely applied to cable installation through floors or walls.

standard boot

Molded Boot

Molded boot does not protect the locking clip. It is easy to plug in and out. This type of boot is suitable for hard-to-access space where cables are seldom plugged or unplugged.

molded boot

Snagless Boot

Snagless boot has a small flap to protect the RJ45 clip. It is often used in applications where there are high insertion cycles in easy-to-access space.

snagless boot

Slim Boot

Slim boot has a 28% reduction in diameter than the snagless boot. It offers the minimal protection and is easy to plug or unplug. This type of booted cable is usually seen in high-density applications.

slim boot

No Boot

Non-booted RJ45 cable is much easier for plugging or unplugging, but the whole connector is exposed with no protection. This type is typically used for applications that don’t require frequent unplugging.

no boot

Conclusion

In summary, if you want to have better protection for your Ethernet cables, using plug boots is an ideal solution. If the application does not demand too much cable shifting, non-booted cables are also acceptable. No matter which type of RJ45 cable you choose, the decision must be made according to your own project.

Guide to Build Up Home Network

Since network has been ubiquitous in today’s world, building it into our home seems to be necessary when moving into a new house. However, millions of households are haunted by the terrible cabling mess. Cables are usually tucked into corners, tangled around the ceiling or jumbled behind devices. If you want these problems to be solved, a good plan for home network is a must. Have you ever thought about setting up home network all by yourself? This article can be the guidance to the beginners.

home network

Advantages of Good Home Network

A good home network is beneficial to the visual neatness. House will be more tidy when less cables are exposed to the surface. Most wires will be installed through the walls. Possibility of cable mess is greatly reduced and you don’t need to be nervous about tripping over by the cables. Constructing a good home network also increases the value of the home. If the house is for sale in the future, a built-in network can certainly raise the price potentials. In addition, when setting up the network, you can add some aesthetic designs to your house like painting the wall into a new color or moving wall plates to appropriate places.

Different Network Connections

There are generally three types of home network connections. Choosing a suitable type for the network is also important.

Ethernet/LAN

Ethernet or LAN network uses physical cables to plug into the LAN port of router or switch. The speed for Ethernet cables can reach up to 1 Gbps. The cable length usually runs up to 100 meters without any influence to performance. Using a wired network is more secure and reliable. However, if you want to totally get rid of the cabling mess, there are better alternatives.

wired network

WiFi/Wireless LAN

People nowadays are familiar about this wireless network. It is the network that operates through radio waves without any wires. The latest 802.11ac standard defines the WiFi network for the maximum of gigabit speed. Wireless network allows for easier access to mobile devices and is simple to be set up. However, the signal also has a limited range and is easily interfered by other devices or buildings.

wireless network

Power Line

Power line network, known as Ethernet over Power (EoP) is carried through the existing wiring. With the help of adapter plugs, it can be connected to small devices by standard Ethernet cables. It is a good option when installing traditional network cabling is not possible but you want better performance than wireless.

Components Needed for Home Network

Central hub, Ethernet jack, wall plate and Ethernet cable are some basic components for the home network. Technically, a basic four-port switch could accomplish your goals in the central hub. Ethernet jack makes the installation more professional and allows for easier connection with wall plate. Wall plate also provides an easier and stable location for cables to plug into. Of course, Ethernet cable is indispensable and should be selected according to your needs.

How to Expand Home Network

When Ethernet ports are running out on the router, you can buy a new one to add more ports so as to expand the wired network. As for the wireless network, the problem is always about the range of signal coverage. You can try the commercial WiFi extender, or use metal can to focus the antenna in a specific direction.

Conclusion

Many homes are now building up networks into their places. A wonderful home network can provide you with better online experience. This post only offers some basic knowledge about home network. If you are unprofessional, please consult the specialists first before starting the construction.

Related Article: Let Surveillance Camera Guard Your Home Safety

How to DIY Ethernet Cables?

Buying the Ethernet cables in stores is probably a common way for average people. However, have you ever met the problem that the cable length is too long or too short? It is so difficult to find the most appropriate cable length at ordinary stores for your network. Especially when the cable is too long, the extra length may end up becoming a mess at your place. In order to solve this issue, why not make your own Ethernet cables? You can create your desired length and the procedures are fairly simple. This post will guide you to make a DIY Ethernet cable.

Essential Tools and Materials

Before you get started, there are some necessary tools and materials needed during the procedure. Wire cutter or wire stripper is used for the task of cutting and stripping wires. RJ45 cable crimping tool can make your cable’s data plug a permanent part of your new cable. RJ45 data plugs are important materials which can be found at many cable stores. Some plugs are labeled specifically Cat 6 or Cat 5e, you can buy specific ones if your network needs one or the other. And you should prepare the bulk Cat 5, Cat 5e, Cat 6 or other Ethernet cables according to your needs. Sometimes, having a cable tester is better since it will save time and prevent headaches down the line when you have a problem with a cable or connection.

Which Wiring Schemes?

Ethernet cables have several standard wiring schemes. T568A and T568B are the common wiring schemes which define the order of the individual wires and pin-outs for eight-pin modular connectors and jacks. If the cable is used for home-networking connections, T568B wiring scheme is recommended. T568A wiring scheme may be employed for the preexisting residential network wiring or other similar projects. The following figure presents the different wiring orders of T568A and T568B.

t568a-t568b-wiring-schemes

Ethernet Cable DIY Steps

After all the preparations, now you are ready to make your own Ethernet cable. Follow these steps and you will soon have your first self-made cable.

    • Step 1, measure the cable to the proper length you want. And don’t forget to add an inch or two because you may lose a bit of cable during the process. Then use the tool to cut down the cable.

cut-the-ethernet-cable

    • Step 2, remove the outer jacket of the cable. A good way to do so is to cut lengthwise with snips or a knife along the side of the cable, away from yourself, about an inch toward the open end. Also leave an inch to an inch and a half if you are green hand.

strip-the-cable-jacket

    • Step 3, untwist and straighten the wires, then arrange the wires into the desired scheme order.

wire-the-cable-into-specific-order

    • Step 4, once your wires are in the correct order, trim the excess away. Only leave slightly less wire to be fit inside the RJ45 clip. And hold the wires in place with your fingers and insert them all at once into the data plug.

install-cable-into-plug

    • Step 5, place your data plug into your crimping tool and give it a firm squeeze. And you just finally complete your Ethernet cable.

cimp-data-plug

Conclusion

If condition permits, using the cable tester to test the Ethernet cable before installation is recommended. Getting this new skill, you will no more worry about the cable length, you can make them as long or as short as you want. Enjoy using your DIY Ethernet cable!

RJ45 Colors and Wiring Guide Diagram TIA/EIA 568 AB

The information listed here is to assist Network Administrators in the color coding of Ethernet cables. Please be aware that modifying Ethernet cables improperly may cause loss of network connectivity. Use this information at your own risk, and ensure all connectors and cables are modified in accordance with TIA standards.

Basic Theory: By looking at a T-568A UTP Ethernet straight-thru cable and an Ethernet crossover cable with a T-568B end, we see that the TX (transmitter) pins are connected to the corresponding RX (receiver) pins, plus to plus and minus to minus. You can also see that both the blue and brown wire pairs on pins 4, 5, 7, and 8 are not used in either standard. What you may not realize is that, these same pins 4, 5, 7, and 8 are not used or required in 100BASE-TX as well. So why bother using these wires, well for one thing its simply easier to make a connection with all the wires grouped together. Otherwise you’ll be spending time trying to fit those tiny little wires into each of the corresponding holes in the RJ-45 connector.

The T-568A standard is supposed to be used in new network installations. Most off-the-shelf Ethernet cables are still of the T-568B standard; however, it makes absolutely no functional difference in which you choose.

Both the T-568A and the T-568B standard Straight-Through cables are used most often as patch cords for your Ethernet connections. If you require a cable to connect two Ethernet devices directly together without a hub or when you connect two hubs together, you will need to use a Crossover cable instead.

A good way of remembering how to wire a Crossover Ethernet cable is to wire one end using the T-568A standard and the other end using the T-568B standard. Another way of remembering the color coding is to simply switch the Green set of wires in place with the Orange set of wires. Specifically, switch the solid Green (G) with the solid Orange, and switch the green/white with the orange/white.

How to Build an Ethernet Cable Instructions:

1. Pull the cable off the reel to the desired length and cut using wire cutters or scissors. If you are pulling cables through holes, it’s easier to attach the RJ-45 plugs after the cable is pulled. The total length of wire segments between a PC and a switch or between two PC’s cannot exceed 100 Meters (328 feet) for 100BASE-TX and 300 Meters for 10BASE-T.
2. Start on one end and strip the cable jacket off (about 1″) using a wire stripper or a knife. Be extra careful not to nick the wires, otherwise you will need to start over.
3. Spread, untwist the pairs, and arrange the wires in the order of the desired cable end. Flatten the end between your thumb and forefinger. Trim the ends of the wires so they are even with one another, leaving only 1/2″ in wire length. If it is longer than 1/2″ it will be out-of-spec and susceptible to crosstalk. Flatten and insure there are no spaces between wires.
4. Hold the RJ-45 plug with the clip facing down or away from you. Push the wires firmly into the plug. Inspect each wire is flat even at the front of the plug. Check the order of the wires. Double check again. Check that the jacket is fitted right against the stop of the plug. Carefully hold the wire and firmly crimp the RJ-45 with the crimp tool.
5. Check the color orientation, check that the crimped connection is not about to come apart, and check to see if the wires are flat against the front of the plug. If even one of these are incorrect, you will have to start over. Test the Ethernet cable.

Ethernet Cable Tips:

  • A straight-thru cable has identical ends.
  • A crossover cable has different ends.
  • A straight-thru is used as a patch cord in Ethernet connections.
  • A crossover is used to connect two Ethernet devices without a hub or for connecting two hubs.
  • A crossover has one end with the Orange set of wires switched with the Green set.
  • Odd numbered pins are always striped, even numbered pins are always solid colored.
  • Looking at the RJ-45 with the clip facing away from you, Brown is always on the right, and pin 1 is on the left.
  • No more than 1/2″ of the Ethernet cable should be untwisted otherwise it will be susceptible to crosstalk.
  • Do not deform, do not bend, do not stretch, do not staple, do not run parallel with power cables, and do not run Ethernet cables near noise inducing components.

Ethernet And Fiber Optic Cabling

Even in the age of WiFi and high speed cellular networks, we still need networking cables to together our computing hardware together. Both Ethernet cables and fiber optic cables are used to deliver and distribute communications. Offering a fast, secure and reliable connection, these cables play different roles in delivering critical entertainment and business data.

Ethernet Cable
Originally developed by Xerox in the 1970s, Category 5 and 6 cables, or Cat 7 cable connect computers and gaming systems to routers in our homes and offices. Recognized by their large locking RJ45 plastic connectors and resembling over-sized phone wires, these cables carry data measured in the hundreds of megabits per second. These multi-conductor cables also connect routers to modems and switches, depending on a network’s configuration.

Ethernet data rates vary depending on the cable used. The newest Cat 7 cable, 10 Gigabit Ethernet, transmits up to 10 Gbps. Category 7 technology improves both internal signaling and exterior shielding compared to older CAT5 / CAT5e and CAT6 cables. CAT 7 cable supports 10 Gigabit Ethernet network connections, and CAT7 cables are also compatible with standard Ethernet adapters.Gigabit Ethernet transmits up to 1 Gbps. Fast Ethernet, still the most common cable used in homes and offices today, transmits up to 100 Mbps (approximately 0.1 Gbps).

Fiber Optic Cable
Fiber optic cable’s primary claim to fame is its ability to carry vast amounts of data over considerable distances. Fiber optic wiring is normally found leading from an Internet service provider’s central distribution center to individual localized hubs in a neighborhood. Amazingly, this data is carried along glass or plastic fibers as light. Depending on whether the Internet service is DSL or cable-based, phone wires or coaxial cable then lead to each address. Fiber optic cable retrofits have enabled service providers to offer higher speeds and increased data throughput. Signals on fiber optic cables are typically repeated or boosted to compensate for signal losses over distance.

At distances up to 1.86 miles, single-mode fiber-optic cable can transmit data up to 10 Gbps, but it is used primarily for video. It is used primarily for high-bandwidth video or as a backbone to connect networks between buildings. Multimode fiber, which is used for voice, data, and video, has a data rate up to 1 Gigabit per second for distances under 1.24 miles.

Multifiber Push-On (“MPO”) fiber trunks (like MPO to LC cable) have become the default cabling solution to these ever-increasing data center bandwidth requirements. Because they are a natural fit for parallel optics, these fiber links are compact, pre-terminated, able to handle bandwidth all the way up to 100 Gbps, and even plug and play by design.

People always think fiber optic cable would beat copper Ethernet cable hands down. However, cable manufacturers have continued to update the technology behind Ethernet, meaning it can be just as fast as some fiber optic cables today. For example, Cat 7 cable is a next-generation standard cabling technology transmits up to 10 Gbps. While Ethernet cable and fiber optic cable are completely different, fiber optic cable can be used in Ethernet networks. Ehernet cable price and fiber optic cable price are also not the same, choosing Ethernet cable or fiber optic cable you should take it into consideration.