Ethernet Switch vs Splitter—How Much Do You Know?

Today, our lives hardly do without Internet communication. We do shopping, letter writing and business all relying on the Ethernet connections both at home and office. And Gigabit Ethernet switch and splitter are the networking devices that are primarily used for connecting different computers or other networking devices. However, they are quite different. Here focus on Ethernet switch vs splitter.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter: What Are They?

First, let’s figure out the definitions of the two terms.

What Is Ethernet Switch?

An Ethernet switch is a high speed networking device that provides more ports for subnets to connect more computers, printers, cameras and so on in a building or campus. Through the ports, the data switch can receive incoming data packets and redirects the data to their intended destination within a LAN. Usually, an Ethernet switch not only works at the data link layer which is also called layer 2, but also can operate at the network layer (layer 3) or above.

What Is Splitter?

A network splitter acts as the optical power distribution device, like a coaxial cable transmission system. It’s one of the most important passive devices which means it doesn’t need external power except for light. As the name implies that it can split a single Internet connection to create extra connections, as a result the additional or other computers on a network could be connected.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter: What Are the Differences?

Ethernet switch can be used for networks that include different devices, for example, a computer and a video game console or a printer. In addition, general switch needs a power input so that it can divide an Ethernet signal into various signals, and the signals can operate at the same time. As a result, different devices can be connected by the switch and work simultaneously.

As for Ethernet splitter, there is no need for power input. And splitters need to be used in pairs. It physically splits a single Ethernet connection into two connections. Simply put, if you want to connect two computers in one room and a switch in another room, then you need the splitters. Instead of using two Ethernet cables from one room to another, the splitters can physically split one Ethernet cable into two to connect the computers and the switch. This is the main principle for the issue that how to use Ethernet splitter.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter: Where to buy?

The following products of Ethernet splitter vs switch are from FS.COM.

S5800-48F4S Switch

This is a 10gb Ethernet switch that has 48×1GbE SFP ports and 4×10GbE SFP+ ports. With a switching capacity of 176Gbps, it supports comprehensive L2 and L3 network management features. The switch offers MLAG, MPLS, IPv4/IPv6, SNMP etc. Designed with the max power draw of 75W and switching capacity of 176Gbps, this switch is ideal for traditional or fully virtualized data center.

Ethernet Switch vs Splitter-switch

Figure 1: S5800-48F4S Switch

Conlusion

As for Ethernet switch vs splitter, we have known how do Ethernet splitters work and how do switch work. Both of them can optimize our network that allow us to work in an efficient and high secure way. Welcome to visit FS.COM to pick your own Ethernet switch and splitter.

What Is Redundant Link between Switches?

We know that if any chain in the network fails, the operation may break down. Facing this problem, we’ve introduced the stackable switches and together with it is the concept of redundant links. When stacking switches, except the shortest link between switch and the main frame computer, we also prepare other links in case of the break down of the major link. The other links are redundant links between switches.

Introduction of Redundant Link

In order to maintain the stability of the network, composed of multiple switches, some backup connections are usually used to improve the robustness and stability of the network. The backup connection here is also called a backup link or a redundant link. Redundant links in a switches are accomplished through the use of multiple switches or multiple links between switches.

In an enterprise network, a link is redundant if its presence or absence does not affect the nature of the mechanism. That is, even if we remove that link, the mechanism will behave in the same manner.
Redundant link between switches

Pros and Cons of Redundant Link

Pros

The redundancy in networks can improve its reliability. Our intention is that if one device fails, another can automatically take over. By adding a little bit of complexity, we try to reduce the probability that a failure in switch will take the whole network down. Spanning Tree Protocol,the redundancy protocols, can be implemented on any topology or mesh. The Cellular Redundancy provides alternative to running a physical line for redundancy. In addition, with Parallel Redundancy Protocol, we can achieve zero packet loss, “0ms” recovery. And it can be added to any existing network.

Cons

But you cannot have both complexity and reliability at the same time. The more complex something is, the harder it is to maintain, the greater the chance of human error, and the greater the chance of a software bug causing a new failure mode.

The switches between the backup links are often connected to each other to form a loop. The loops can be redundant to a certain extent. The redundant backup of the links can bring robustness, stability and reliability to the network. However, the backup link also causes loops in the network. The loop problem is the most serious problem faced by the backup link. The loop between the switches will cause new network problems: broadcast storm, loops and duplicate frames.

Tips

To make fully use of redundant links, we can minimize the complexity. Select two identical switches as the core switches. If you need gigabit Ethernet switch, for example, you can select two 10 gbe switches that run the same software and have the same connections. We can also introduce the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) which was developed as a Layer 2 loop-avoidance mechanism for redundant links in a switched network. With STP, there will be only one logical path between all destinations on the network and redundant links that could cause a loop are intentionally blocked.

Conclusion

Redundant links are useful to a great extent. That’s why so many people now choose stackable switches rather than standalone ones to maintain the efficient network operation. Stackable switches are now our star products and focal point. We would like to introduce our high quality fiber switch to every people in need of reliable network performance.

Fibre Channel VS Ethernet Switch: What’s the Difference?

Fibre Channel (FC) is a serial I/O interconnect network technology capable of supporting multiple protocols. It is used primarily for storage area networks (SANs). Ethernet (and TCP/IP) is the most frequently used technology these days for communication between devices. But for storage, the dominant technology in a data center often is Fibre Channel. Fibre channel vs Ethernet switch: what’s the difference? This article makes an analysis from the following aspects: reliability, transmission speed, flexibility and cost.

Fibre Channel VS Ethernet Switch: Reliability

If you are actively engaged in optic communication, you may have noticed that the fibre channel switch is lossless while Ethernet switch is risk of dropping frame. Fibre Channel is often compared to Ethernet in terms of being a lossless protocol. As for fibre channel switch, it works smoothly without dropping a single frame, and frames must be delivered in order. FC switches will send signal when they’re congesting to other devices, so these devices stop sending frames, lest the frames are dropped. This in contrast to Ethernet which will just start dropping frames when congested, relying on upper layers (like TCP) to make sure everything keeps working.

Fibre Channel VS Ethernet Switch: Transmission Speed

The maximum data rate of the fibre channel switch in the very beginning is 1 Gbps. Now it has evolved up to 128 Gbps, with 8, 16, and 32 Gbps versions still available.

The Ethernet switch transmission speed ranges from Fast Ethernet (10/100 Mbps), Gigabit Ethernet (10/100/1000Mbps), 10 Gigabit (10/100/1000/10000 Mbps) to even some 40/100 Gbps speeds. In terms of transmission speed, the Ethernet switch seems to outweigh fibre channel switch. Whereas both are in a high speed evolution.

Fibre Channel VS Ethernet Switch: Cost

Cost is also an element to be considered. In most cases, Ethernet switches are much cheaper than Fibre Channel switches. What’s more, the maintenance is also a factor that should be considered. In large IT systems, if an Ethernet switch breaks down, most admins can deal with it. However, when there is something wrong with the fibre channel switch, you need to turn to manufacturers, instead. Comparing to Ethernet switch, fibre channel switch adopts more complicated design in that it should guarantee the extremely availability of data storage, and is equipped with management function.

 FS switch

Conclusion

Seen from above, there are significant differences between fibre channel switch and Ethernet switch. FC is a network standard to enable hosts (servers) to interconnect with storage devices. It’s completely different from Ethernet. A storage network switch is not the same as an Ethernet network switch. Initially, the only transmission medium of FC was fiber, but these days twisted pair copper wire is also available. That’s the opposite of Ethernet, which originally ran only on copper wires and then on fiber. FS.COM provides a variety of Ethernet switches  and fiber switches which are mostly upgraded and optimized by our research and development staff, ranging from 10gbe switch to gigabit ethernet switchFor more information, you can search “Fiberstore” on website or YouTube.

2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch or 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch

In computer networking, an Ethernet switch is a LAN interconnection device that serves as a bridge between multiple equipment and a Local Area Network (LAN). Ethernet switches are categorized into two main types – modular and fixed configuration. Fixed configuration switches have a fixed number of ports and are not expandable. You can select the switches based on the number of ports. The larger the network, the greater number of ports you’ll need. Fixed configuration switches are generally available in 5, 8, 10, 16, 24, 28, 48, and 52-port configurations. Some people may question that is it a good idea to purchase two 8-port switches other than one 16 port gigabit switch since the price of two 8-port switches is much lower than that of one 16 port gigabit switch? 2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch VS 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch—a good question worthy of discussing.

2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch VS 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch

This question is very common and can be subjective according to the urgency of uptime, financial budget, network management and space involved. If most variables are not a problem, then, the answer is YES. Taking two switches from different vendors as an example, there is a wide gap between their price.

S1130-8T2F Managed PoE+ Switch

FS.COM S1130-8T2F managed PoE+ switch comes with 8x 10/100/1000Base-T RJ45 Ethernet ports. It can supply power to network equipment such as weather-proof IP cameras with windshield wiper and heater, high-performance AP and IP telephone. This managed PoE+ switch is highly flexible, the transmission distance of the SFP fiber port can be up to 120km, and with high resistance to electromagnetic interference. It also features superior performance in stability, environmental adaptability and the price of it is $159.

S1130-8T2F 8 port Gigabit Switch

Intellinet 16 Port Gigabit Ethernet PoE+ Web-Managed Switch

Intellinet 16 port gigabit Ethernet PoE+ web-managed switch with 2 SFP ports is sold at $501. Equipped with sixteen Gigabit Ethernet ports, all of which support 802.3at/af Power over Ethernet (PoE/PoE+), this switch can power wireless LAN access points and bridges, VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) telephones, IP surveillance cameras.

Apart from price, there are other elements need to be considered. If the entire network depends on a single switch and, unfortunately, the unit undergoes a catastrophic failure, the whole network would break down. However, if one of the 2 switches fails, only half the network is down but still able to limp along until there is a replacement. The only shortcoming is that you will lose two ports by connecting them, which means that you will have a 14-port switch if you buy two 8 ports.

If you need to expand in the future, it’ll be nicer to work with a 16 port gigabit switch instead of a couple 8’s. In smaller setups and homes, you can hardly notice the difference between the two, because you seldom have lots of transfers all at the same time and all destined for ports on the opposite switch. While in larger data centers, it can make a difference as you are constricting data flow by forcing 7 ports through one port to get to the other switch.

Conclusion

Gigabit Ethernet transmitting at approximately one gigabit per second, as well as fiber optic cable are all products created in line with people’s desire for faster broadband. Most people turn to gigabit switches as they are easy to use, provide plug and play installations and can save the power consumption. After analyzing the issue—2 * 8 Port Gigabit Switch VS 1 * 16 Port Gigabit Switch, I sincerely hope it can help you make a right choice.

Related Article: How to Choose an 8 Port Gigabit Switch?


Powering PoE Switch From A PoE Switch: Is It Possible?

PoE (Power Over Ethernet) technology supports power and data transmission over the same Ethernet cable, which makes the cabling easier and greatly saves the space. Characterized by this advantage, PoE switch gains the popularity among many users. In practical application, we may meet some emergency, such as power failure. At this time, is powering PoE switch from a PoE switch possible? This article will discuss this topic.

Working Principe of PoE Switch

Before we come to the answer of powering PoE switch from a PoE switch, let’s learn about working principle of PoE switch. A whole PoE system consists of Powering Sourcing Equipment (PSE) and Power Device (PD). PoE switch is a type of PSE device. The PSE device not only powers Ethernet client devices, but also manage the entire Power over Ethernet process. While the PD device is PSE load which receives power, or we can call it PoE system client. The working principle pf PoE switch can be divided into five steps. For applications of PoE switch, you can read this article: Using PoE Switch for Different IP Camera Systems

Detection: PoE switch outputs very small voltage on the port, until it detects that the PD equipment connected to the cable end supports the IEEE802.3af standard.

PD Classification: After detecting the PD, PoE switch may classify PD equipment, and assess the power loss of PD equipment.

Begin to Supply Power: In a configurable time (usually less than 15μs) start-up period, PoE switch begin to power PD equipment with low voltage, until it provides 48V DC power supply.

Power Supply: PoE switch provide stable and reliable 48V DC power for PD equipment to meet the power consumption which is less than 15.4W.

Power Off: If the PD equipment is disconnected from the network, the PoE switch will stop powering the PD equipment quickly, generally within 300-400ms, and repeat to detect whether the end of the cable is connected to the PD equipment.

Powering PoE Device From A PoE Switch

PoE switch is self-adaptive. When the PSE has the power supply requirement, the PD will output the voltage to the PSE. This means the switch can be powered by PoE while simultaneously providing power by PoE to other devices such as IP phones or wireless access points. This provides great flexibility because it means that the switch can be deployed without the constraints of an AC power outlet. As for powering PoE switch from a PoE switch, Universal PoE (UPOE) technology will be required and the following part will talk about UPOE. The following figure shows the evolution of PoE technology.

Evolution of PoE Standard

Powering PoE Switch From A PoE Switch with UPOE Technology

UPOE technology is a new innovation from Cisco Systems which happens to the industry’s first 60-watt Power over Ethernet technology. It can offer twice the power per port of the switch—providing both power and network access to a greater range of devices through a single standard Ethernet cable. This can surely help to lower the total cost of IT operations. By using UPOE technology, powering PoE switch from a PoE switch is possible. Here is an example to help you have a better understanding of this.

Most major networking vendors provide PoE Passthru, but they all require using higher powered sources. It physically would be impossible otherwise. If X is the power provided to the switch and Y is the power the switch uses, then Z is the power available for PoE devices. Then X – Y = Z. If you want Z to meet the PoE specification, then X has to be at least: Z + Y which means your input power needs to be UPOE.

Conclusion

As the enterprise workspace evolves with more and more end devices for communication, collaboration, security, and productivity, the need of PoE is also evolving to support newer end devices with increased power requirements. Regarded as upgrade of PoE, UPOE technology doubles the power delivered per port over PoE+ to 60 Watts which can extend resilient network power to a broad range of devices. What’s more, it realizes powering PoE switch from a PoE switch.